Not a pleasant post to read, but important to determine your stance on it and to know other ways to protect your kids. Predators are not often the hooded figure lurking in the bushes with lollipops and promises of puppies. Most of them are known to us and trusted by us and our kids see us trusting them. In our family, from infancy, we have always asked our children’s permission to tickle. We have been diligent in teaching our kids to say no if they don’t like it or when it stops being fun and we also to insist that someone stop if they are the ones tickling and the receiver says no. We check in with our kids during tickling or roughhousing by saying, “Do you want more?” or “Is everyone still having fun?” What about visitors in your home, like grandparents? You’re confident that they are well-intentioned but…

Alison Smith Parent Coaching | Support?  What Support?! 2

Why you may not be getting the support you think you’re asking for. I’ve got a little something for you today that’s helpful even for the work world,…

A parent asks: My five-year old doesn’t want to participate in music class. He doesn’t want to participate in anything – last year it was karate – and when he doesn’t want to participate, he says he “doesn’t feel well”. I don’t know what to do. Alison answers: You are not alone. In fact, my own family has experienced this very thing. This issue can cause exasperation for parents and a lot of stress for the child. If not addressed in a positive way, it can cause a rift between the parent and child. This rift can actually begin to erode the child’s trust in the parent that his or her parent will help when they are struggling. Obviously, this is not something us loving parents would ever intend to do! It is important to note here that children who feel connected with their parent will want to please them.…

Alison Smith Parent Coaching | When People Pull Away

We all have moments when our limiting beliefs affect our relationships. Others may not know what we are struggling with exactly, but they always pick up on the…

Meltdowns may be a fact of life with small children, but the Terrible Two’s are not a life sentence. Knowing what our little ones are trying to communicate goes a long way in managing meltdowns. When they are crying or throwing themselves on the floor in an epic tantrum, they are indeed communicating. When they are little, this is normal for their developmental age. They may be telling us they are hungry, tired, bored, overstimulated or a variety of other legitimate needs. They may also need to vent some overwhelming emotions. Current neuroscience tells us that when any of us are flooded by emotion, we are incapable of logical reasoning. Have you ever had your spouse try to fix your ‘problem’ before you had a chance to share your feelings about it? Kids feel the same way yet their brains are far less developed than ours, particularly in regards to…

“So, I’ve been trying this Gentle Parenting thing and it’s great for my kids!  They’re really responding to having their voices heard.  I’ve noticed fewer meltdowns.  And they’re even getting along with each other better!” “Um…but…me?  I’m exhausted.  If this is supposed to be so good and natural for my kids, why am I feeling so worn out?  I feel like I have a quota of gentle parenting and when that is maxed out, I lose my cool.  Am I doing something wrong?”  This scenario comes up for some parents who are working hard to parent consciously and gently, particularly if they were parented in an authoritarian or authoritative home.  Let us explore why this occurs and in future articles, we can discover some strategies for easing the energy drain. There can be many reasons why a parent could be experiencing this energy drain.  For some, it may be that…