Dear Alison, I know you’ll have effective ideas for me because I remember how good your workshop ones were. You helped me see how important the connection with my son is. I would like to move a step forward by asking specifically – How do we as parents and caregivers adjust to and cope with children who are new to the school system? Those children who come home utterly exhausted, showing new behaviors or emotions that have never been present before. How can we guide them and be completely available to their needs when we only see them just in the evening? The needs we aren’t available to fulfill during the day. It can be hard to accept the changes in personality and behaviors in our children when we have laid a strong foundation already. I’ve worked really hard at it. He has a fantastic teacher and there is great communication…

Before we get to the ways you can create this for yourself, I’ve got a few questions. Do you think most people have a bit of ‘geek’ in them? Do you? (Would you ever admit it? Lol.) Me? I am a ‘parenting-geek’, if there IS such a thing! I talk parenting, I think parenting, I listen to parenting. I’m in multiple online parent forums. And as you may know, I connect regularly with other positive parenting specialists–I even call some friends. As you might expect from parenting educators, they’re a pretty nice bunch. While other moms are researching their next resort trip or pinning tasty-looking Paleo recipes; I’m over here chatting with people in Facebook groups, reading parenting-related blogs, and generally keeping my pulse on the topic. It just so happens that I’m an active member of a number of coaching and entrepreneur groups, too. In fact, we’ve even talked kid…

It takes a village to raise a child, but it takes a community to support the parent. – Alison Smith Parenting can feel real lonely sometimes… When my kids were little and I was a stay-at-home mom, I was seldom alone. However, when I had a rare moment with my own thoughts, I realized I was really lonely. Have you ever felt that way? I missed being able to have a whole conversation with a friend without interruptions. I so craved interaction with other grown-ups that I found myself hoping for a chat with cashiers, the librarian, and anyone who would listen. Going for groceries alone became a treat, just so I could feel like a normal human again…and finish a complete sentence! It’s so important for us parents to connect with others. Parenting is hard enough. The effects are amplified by feelings of isolation. Sometimes we feel isolated…

Alison Smith Parent Coaching | 5 Simple Ways to Gain Cooperation 2

If only our kids would cooperate with us, our job would be so much easier, right? I get how frustrating it can be. I also know that if we are not careful how we gain their cooperation, we can create future problems for ourselves and our kids.

These last few weeks have been a big adjustment for our family, as I imagine it has for many others. We have had a major work change for one member, public school starting for another and our youngest has started his first foray into public, group childcare. Needless to say, we have seen more than a few effects from these big changes. For our youngest, it has been difficult adjusting to being away from his home and family. It became apparent through his meltdowns at home and his clinging, begging and crying at drop-off, that he was struggling. Add to that, he outright told us that he did not like daycare! We made sure there was no actual problem with the choice of childcare venue, of course. But since he was drawing on every argument and method of convincing us that a small human could muster, and every day he…