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holidays

Not a pleasant post to read, but important to determine your stance on it and to know other ways to protect your kids. Predators are not often the hooded figure lurking in the bushes with lollipops and promises of puppies. Most of them are known to us and trusted by us and our kids see us trusting them. In our family, from infancy, we have always asked our children’s permission to tickle. We have been diligent in teaching our kids to say no if they don’t like it or when it stops being fun and we also to insist that someone stop if they are the ones tickling and the receiver says no. We check in with our kids during tickling or roughhousing by saying, “Do you want more?” or “Is everyone still having fun?” What about visitors in your home, like grandparents? You’re confident that they are well-intentioned but…

Meltdowns may be a fact of life with small children, but the Terrible Two’s are not a life sentence. Knowing what our little ones are trying to communicate goes a long way in managing meltdowns. When they are crying or throwing themselves on the floor in an epic tantrum, they are indeed communicating. When they are little, this is normal for their developmental age. They may be telling us they are hungry, tired, bored, overstimulated or a variety of other legitimate needs. They may also need to vent some overwhelming emotions. Current neuroscience tells us that when any of us are flooded by emotion, we are incapable of logical reasoning. Have you ever had your spouse try to fix your ‘problem’ before you had a chance to share your feelings about it? Kids feel the same way yet their brains are far less developed than ours, particularly in regards to…

School will be out soon and we’re all getting ready for the holidays.  This combination of excitement and preparation can get pretty stressful.  Here are some parenting tips to keep your Christmas Ogre at bay. Stay focused on the key aspects of Gentle Parenting:  Empathize.  Empower. Remain connected as a family.  This may mean only making 3 types of cookies instead of 5, in favour of spending some more time together.  Are there ways the kids can help?  Talking is another way to keep that connection strong.  Ask them how they’re feeling.  Kids pick up on our stress and little ones, especially, may not understand why we’re running around like chickens with our heads cut off or are snapping at everyone instead of our being our usual cheery self.  Buy an experience, rather than a toy, and do it with them. Be sure to empathize with what they are thinking…