Tag

connection

It takes a village to raise a child, but it takes a community to support the parent. – Alison Smith Parenting can feel real lonely sometimes… When my kids were little and I was a stay-at-home mom, I was seldom alone. However, when I had a rare moment with my own thoughts, I realized I was really lonely. Have you ever felt that way? I missed being able to have a whole conversation with a friend without interruptions. I so craved interaction with other grown-ups that I found myself hoping for a chat with cashiers, the librarian, and anyone who would listen. Going for groceries alone became a treat, just so I could feel like a normal human again…and finish a complete sentence! It’s so important for us parents to connect with others. Parenting is hard enough. The effects are amplified by feelings of isolation. Sometimes we feel isolated…

We want to be good parents and we want to give our children as much of our focus and time as we can. We know that giving our children our time is important for their optimal development. Yet we’re swamped with demands and juggling our family’s schedules and individual needs. We can certainly look for areas to simplify and be conscious of how we are prioritizing our time as much as we can. Yet, beyond the basics of keeping our children safe and healthy, we know we’ve also got a duty to care for their mental, social and emotional needs. As a conscious and dedicated parent, we expend significant energy observing our children’s behaviour and needs, evaluating our parenting strategies and adjusting our approach, while also managing ourselves. That’s a lot on our plates. Is there anything we can do to make better use of time with our kids? To…

If only our kids would cooperate with us, our job would be so much easier, right? I get how frustrating it can be. I also know that if we are not careful how we gain their cooperation, we can create future problems for ourselves and our kids.

These last few weeks have been a big adjustment for our family, as I imagine it has for many others. We have had a major work change for one member, public school starting for another and our youngest has started his first foray into public, group childcare. Needless to say, we have seen more than a few effects from these big changes. For our youngest, it has been difficult adjusting to being away from his home and family. It became apparent through his meltdowns at home and his clinging, begging and crying at drop-off, that he was struggling. Add to that, he outright told us that he did not like daycare! We made sure there was no actual problem with the choice of childcare venue, of course. But since he was drawing on every argument and method of convincing us that a small human could muster, and every day he…

Not a pleasant post to read, but important to determine your stance on it and to know other ways to protect your kids. Predators are not often the hooded figure lurking in the bushes with lollipops and promises of puppies. Most of them are known to us and trusted by us and our kids see us trusting them. In our family, from infancy, we have always asked our children’s permission to tickle. We have been diligent in teaching our kids to say no if they don’t like it or when it stops being fun and we also to insist that someone stop if they are the ones tickling and the receiver says no. We check in with our kids during tickling or roughhousing by saying, “Do you want more?” or “Is everyone still having fun?” What about visitors in your home, like grandparents? You’re confident that they are well-intentioned but…

We all have moments when our limiting beliefs affect our relationships. Others may not know what we are struggling with exactly, but they always pick up on the vibe. They know we are trying to get our needs met in indirect and unhealthy ways–and they want to get far away from that negative energy! We have all felt people pulling away from us. Next time, notice what you are doing or saying right before you get that feeling. Chances are it is one of these following 12 behaviours*. “Being envious of everyone else. Taking everything too personally. – What people say and do to you is much more about them, than you. Acting like you’re always a victim. Hoarding pain and loss. – One of the hardest lessons in life is letting go – whether it’s guilt, anger, love or loss. Obsessive negative thinking. – [People who] speak incessantly about the terrible things…