Tag

community

It takes a village to raise a child, but it takes a community to support the parent. – Alison Smith Parenting can feel real lonely sometimes… When my kids were little and I was a stay-at-home mom, I was seldom alone. However, when I had a rare moment with my own thoughts, I realized I was really lonely. Have you ever felt that way? I missed being able to have a whole conversation with a friend without interruptions. I so craved interaction with other grown-ups that I found myself hoping for a chat with cashiers, the librarian, and anyone who would listen. Going for groceries alone became a treat, just so I could feel like a normal human again…and finish a complete sentence! It’s so important for us parents to connect with others. Parenting is hard enough. The effects are amplified by feelings of isolation. Sometimes we feel isolated…

Not a pleasant post to read, but important to determine your stance on it and to know other ways to protect your kids. Predators are not often the hooded figure lurking in the bushes with lollipops and promises of puppies. Most of them are known to us and trusted by us and our kids see us trusting them. In our family, from infancy, we have always asked our children’s permission to tickle. We have been diligent in teaching our kids to say no if they don’t like it or when it stops being fun and we also to insist that someone stop if they are the ones tickling and the receiver says no. We check in with our kids during tickling or roughhousing by saying, “Do you want more?” or “Is everyone still having fun?” What about visitors in your home, like grandparents? You’re confident that they are well-intentioned but…

Why you may not be getting the support you think you’re asking for. I’ve got a little something for you today that’s helpful even for the work world, or with spouses and friends. We’ve all had those moments when we’ve asked for help, only to hear the chirping of crickets. No one steps up. But what if this is a pattern? What if we never seem to get the support we need? I used to wonder why this was an issue for me. Since then, I’ve learned a few things about why this happens and I’m excited to share them with you so you can stop feeling lonely and unsupported. You can ask for support. And actually get it. Are you getting the support you need? Have you ever said to yourself (or maybe even out loud) “Why doesn’t anyone put their dirty socks in the laundry basket? Why do…

A parent asks: My five-year old doesn’t want to participate in music class. He doesn’t want to participate in anything – last year it was karate – and when he doesn’t want to participate, he says he “doesn’t feel well”. I don’t know what to do. Alison answers: You are not alone. In fact, my own family has experienced this very thing. This issue can cause exasperation for parents and a lot of stress for the child. If not addressed in a positive way, it can cause a rift between the parent and child. This rift can actually begin to erode the child’s trust in the parent that his or her parent will help when they are struggling. Obviously, this is not something us loving parents would ever intend to do! It is important to note here that children who feel connected with their parent will want to please them.…

We all have moments when our limiting beliefs affect our relationships. Others may not know what we are struggling with exactly, but they always pick up on the vibe. They know we are trying to get our needs met in indirect and unhealthy ways–and they want to get far away from that negative energy! We have all felt people pulling away from us. Next time, notice what you are doing or saying right before you get that feeling. Chances are it is one of these following 12 behaviours*. “Being envious of everyone else. Taking everything too personally. – What people say and do to you is much more about them, than you. Acting like you’re always a victim. Hoarding pain and loss. – One of the hardest lessons in life is letting go – whether it’s guilt, anger, love or loss. Obsessive negative thinking. – [People who] speak incessantly about the terrible things…

Meltdowns may be a fact of life with small children, but the Terrible Two’s are not a life sentence. Knowing what our little ones are trying to communicate goes a long way in managing meltdowns. When they are crying or throwing themselves on the floor in an epic tantrum, they are indeed communicating. When they are little, this is normal for their developmental age. They may be telling us they are hungry, tired, bored, overstimulated or a variety of other legitimate needs. They may also need to vent some overwhelming emotions. Current neuroscience tells us that when any of us are flooded by emotion, we are incapable of logical reasoning. Have you ever had your spouse try to fix your ‘problem’ before you had a chance to share your feelings about it? Kids feel the same way yet their brains are far less developed than ours, particularly in regards to…